Sunday Lunch with Family

If you know me really well, then first take a deep breath and say ” peace” before you see the picture or read this post. I don’t want to give you a heart attack.

As I was growing up, I never thought that I would grow up to be a mom. Or a mom that cooked a hearty meal for the family on a Sunday afternoon. Those thoughts never crossed my mind.

But, I do now. I cook a hearty meal. And, receive immense happiness from doing it.

During the weekday evenings, we do share dinner. But, it is not at the dining table. One might be eating at the nook. The other one on the bar stool. One might be busy putting the rotis on the tawa. One might be bossing everybody around to call it a wrap and get to the evening to-do list for the day.

I used to be on the run on Sundays too. However, I have made a conscious effort nowdays to cut down on our social commitments and at least share one meal of the weekend together around the dining table. So, Sunday meals are special. We try to sit down together.

Thank you to all my friends (both the gals and the boys) who have inspired me with their cooking skills. I know what you guys are murmuring as you are reading this post. “That’s my girl.” I am glad that I am finally making you proud.

P.S. Don’t message Kumar about how the lunch tasted today afternoon. By now, you already know, for that area to improve, I have a few more decades to go!

Visiting State and National Parks in Texas

“What do parents owe their young that is more important than a warm and trusting connection to the Earth…?” – Theodore Roszak, The Voice of the Earth

“If getting our kids out into nature is a search for perfection, or is one more chore, then the belief in perfection and the chore defeats the joy. It’s a good thing to learn more about nature in order to share this knowledge with children; it’s even better if the adult and child learn about nature together. And it’s a lot more fun.”
― Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

“Let children walk with Nature, let them see the beautiful blendings and communions of death and life, their joyous inseparable unity, as taught in woods and meadows, plains and mountains and streams. ”
— John Muir

Out of all the things I want to leave the kids with… “love and respect for nature” is in the top 10.

There are some things on my bequeath-list that I have to work hard with them and for them.

But I realize now that “love for nature” is something that I don’t have to work hard with them for. It has rubbed off on both of them…perhaps, by just being in proximity with Kumar and me.

We toured State and National Parks in Texas the last couple of days. I lost track. We saw so many peaks. So many lakes. So many creeks. So many trees. I truly lost track.

Just the nature of it all….the nature of nature….so huge….so tremendously wonderful….so awe-inspiring.

I am back in the concrete jungle. But, my heart is still in the forest. It will always be.

Whoever said Texas is flat and boring got it all wrong. Texas is beautiful.

Love for Nature - Ambal's Amusings

Image source: http://images.nationalgeographic.com/wpf/media-live/photos/000/655/overrides/rio-grande-river-big-bend-national-park_65547_600x450.jpg

 

Team Work Pays Off for the Boys

Boys: Big pumpkins.

Grandpa: No..small pumpkins.

Boys: We need BIG pumpkins.

Me: No. Only small pumpkins.

Boys run around the whole pumpkin patch. Then, they run back to Grandpa and me.

Boys: Amma. Please, please, please BIG pumpkins.

Me: Ok. (with a smirk) Here is the deal. I have a coupon. It says buy 1 pumpkin and get another pumpkin of same or lesser size FREE. Why don’t you guys work together? Pick as large a pumpkin as you can. Pick it up together. Carry it together. Put it on the check out stand together. Then, do the same with the second (FREE) pumpkin. No fighting. Everything together. Then, I’ll consider paying.

As I say this, I wink at Grandpa and give him a look that says NO WAY. Grandpa winks back with a look that says NO WAY.

Boys: OK….that is a deal.

For several minutes, the boys run around the whole pumpkin patch to pick the biggest pumpkin that they can carry together. Then, they realize that they can’t carry the REALLY big ones. Finally, they settle on a big pumpkin and strategize on how to carry it together. They carry it all the way to the check out stand.. victoriously and cheering each other on.

At this point, as you probably have guessed already, they have quite a “cheering” audience at the pumpkin patch.

Grandpa and me watch in total awe as they run back to get the second pumpkin.

I (rather sheepishly) pull out 10 bucks from my purse and Grandpa (brimming) pulls out 5 bucks from his purse.

We underestimated the boys.

What can I say? To the victor go the spoils.

I am confident that Grandpa is the proudest granddad that ever walked a pumpkin patch.