On Work Life Blend

We all seek to find balance amongst our various responsibilities.
It is easier said than done.

My colleague Anne and I caught up after work hours on Monday. Anne thanked me for always being available to her. I told her this – “Anne, Yep! I am always available to you. Because, you are one of my favorite girls. Moreover, over the years, I have learnt there is no such thing as work life balance for me. There is ONLY work life blend.” Anne agreed with me and appreciated my observation.

I have all kinds of asks of myself and my life. For example, I don’t believe in not showing up to one the boys concert during work hours. I also don’t believe in not working after I get back home because there should be supposedly be clear boundaries between work and life.

Given the contradictory asks that I have of myself and my life, I do what works for me.
I huddle with my colleagues both during and after work hours to make progress on projects.
I start meetings early or leave late during weekdays…whatever works on that day.
I gain permission (by building trust) to reach colleagues when I have to.
I give colleagues permission to call me when they have to.
I routinely pour over work stuff during the weekends.
I want my boss and colleagues to know that I will always rock heaven, deep earth and everything in between to keep moving the ball forward on all my projects…no matter what the odds.

I also show up to most of the boys events….even if it means showing up a few minutes late.
The boys are elated to see me when I rush in to a performance hall or tournament and wave my hand crazily at them.
I want them to know that they are very important to me…and I will always show up to cheer and support them…no matter what the odds.

In my current state of life, given my varying responsibilities, there can’t be clear boundaries between work and life. If I want to be able to be a parent and an employee, I can’t balance…I need to blend.

Think about it. What works for you?

Whether it is work life balance or work life blend…you do what is right for YOU.
It will all work (pun intended) out eventually!

On Diversity Led Innovation – The Medici Effect

Harvard Business School professor Clayton M. Christensen states that The Medici Effect is “One of the most insightful books on innovation I have ever read.” Clayton himself is a brilliant author and renowned expert on innovation. I have read many of his books and gotten so much of out it. So, I took Clayton ‘s advise and dug into The Medici Effect.

“The Medici Effect” is a term coined by Frans Johansson and used throughout various industries to describe innovation that happens when disciplines and ideas intersect.

What is The Medici Effect?
The Medici Effect is a phenomena of innovation that occurs at the intersection of multiple fields, disciplines and cultures, by combining existing concepts to create extraordinary new ideas.

The name of the book is derived from the Medici Dynasty, an Italian banking family that came to power in the 14th century. The family’s wealth was able to support artists that led to The Renaissance. The book looks at examples of how Renaissance painters, sculptors, poets, philanthropists, scientists, philosophers, financiers, and architects, shaped historical eras of innovation. The Medici family did not intend the Renaissance, but contributed to it with what Johansson coins as the “Medici Effect”.

If you are a curious person like me, you are gonna wanna  know everything there is about the Medicis. So, start here: 7 Things You May Not Know About the Medicis

Check out this great summary: 5 Things Frans Johansson says about innovation

Johansson argues that all new ideas are just combinations of old ideas. In the realm of social innovation, this means that collaboration with people from different backgrounds is the key to success. Read: The Medici Effect’s Frans Johansson On The Intersection Of Innovation And Social Change

“Cultural diversity does not only imply geographically separated cultures. It can also include ethnic, class, professional, or organizational cultures. The mere fact that an individual is different from most people around him promotes more open and divergent, perhaps even rebellious, thinking in that person. Such a person is more prone to question traditions, rules, and boundaries—and to search for answers where others may not think to.”
― Frans Johansson, Medici Effect: What You Can Learn from Elephants and Epidemics

 

Sources:

http://medicieffect.com/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Medici_Effect

The Story of 3 Monday Warriors

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…there lived 3 Monday Warriors.

They woke up on a Monday morning.

One went to high school and survived quizzes, tests and exams.

One went to work and survived meetings.

One just had way too much fun for a Monday.

They all came back home, shared a cup of chai and decided to take on the rest of the work that needed to be done on a Monday evening.

To all you #MondayWarriors and #MondaySurvivors – much love and light.

I would have bet Bolt hands down!

It is too bad that they didn’t hold the Olympics 100 meters dash in Ari’s school parking lot today morning.

Between the comings and goings of my life and the boys life, it has been getting harder and harder to be in the many different places at the same time.

But, I decided that I need to be in the right place, at the right time with the right guy.

So, I told my colleague yesterday night that I wont’ be able to make it to the morning meeting. She obliged and moved the meeting. Bless her heart.

Today morning, I rushed to drop off Adi and my carpool at school.
Then, I rushed back home.
I got in the shower, got dressed and rushed to meet Ari

All because, there was never a guy on this planet who wooed a girl for a breakfast date as much as Ari did for me to join him at his elementary school mom-son breakfast.

Never.

There was never a mom on this planet who dashed from the parking lot to the cafeteria to get to the breakfast date on time as I did.

Never.

I would have bet Bolt hands down.