The UnReality of Reality – Fascinating Digital Images

I have been sharing my love for math, science, quantum physics, metaphysics and more with Adi for as long as I know.

Even before he knew what a wave or particle meant he had possible heard about wave-particle duality. Even before he could pronounce Heisenberg he had possibly heard about Uncertainty Principle. There are many concepts that I don’t understand. But, that hasn’t stopped me from teaching him the concept in some mutated form with the hope that he will one day return to visit me after roving this planet and having a lot better clarity on the (un)-reality of this Universe than I ever will.

Now, there is some background to how I built that hope.

Appa and my dear friend Shashi Sastry told me to teach him everything at an early age without questioning whether he is absorbing it or not.

Since, Appa and Shashi are very wise people I blindly trusted them. I poured forth the knowledge that I have had the fortune of having access to.

Given the digital era we live in, I also encouraged Adi to seek answers through science articles and videos.

A few years ago, as we were discussing the total unreality of reality and how time and space don’t actually exist as we believe them to, I took him along to see Sunil Shah and Renu Vora’s independent film called The Wisdom Tree Film(which showcased science, art, music, mysticism). As a prerequisite to watching the movie, we watched “What the Bleep Do We Know”.

Sadly, with the comings and goings of a crazily scheduled high schooler’s life, Adi hasn’t had the opportunity to chat with me and delve deep into topics that don’t belong in the realm of normal everyday discussions.

You know how they say it is darkest before it dawns.

Right when I was about to give up hope about all the time and effort that I had put in to Adi… wondering whether what he had heard in the last decade had evaporated into ether…and whether I should really invest that same amount of passion, time and effort with Ari…right at the hopeless moment, magic happened.

Yesterday, I think the Universe conspired to tell me that none of my effort has been wasted.

Adi returned (pun, in case you can notice it?!) home and showed me some digital pictures that he had created online. The pictures are not what amazed me. The titles that he had captioned those kaleidoscopic image is what amazed me.

Check it out – The UnReality of Reality – In Pictures

I love all the #REALITY that exists in #UNREALITY.

There is always #HOPE.

If I didn’t have Worldly Responsibilities

If I didn’t have worldly responsibilities, I would possibly be climbing mountains. Because, 2 eyes, 1 lifetime, 1 soul is not enough to enjoy God’s work from mountain peaks.

This shot was taken from my tiny camera at about 14,000 ft in the Inyo National Forest on my way to bagging the Mt. Whitney peak.

On Monday, July 26, 2010 about noon time Kumar and I completed one of our long standing goals of bagging the Mt. Whitney peak.

We ascended the summit from the Whitney Portal trail head at 8,365 feet and completed the round trip 22-mile hike in 19 hours! We managed to hike it without any altitude sickness (which can be dangerous and life-threatening!).

Mt. Whitney is the highest summit in the contiguous United States and the Sierra Nevada, with an elevation of 14,505 feet (4421 m).

Here is a few of my writing on climbing/hiking:
http://ambalbalakrishnan.com/tag/climbing/
http://ambalbalakrishnan.com/tag/hiking/

Signs of Spring

This persimmon tree went completely bald in winter.
Last couple of days, it has been sprouting leaves.
I could write an essay on how I find the sprouting completely magical. But, I don’t have to.

Because Dr. Ian Malcolm Jeff Goldblum said everything there was to be said in “Jurassic Park” – “I’m, I’m simply saying that life, uh… finds a way.”

My huge crush on Dr. Malcolm (and the writer behind him Michael Crichton) hasn’t died in the 2 decades. It is because he said one of the most brilliant phrases ever said about life.

Today was a beautiful rainy day in Austin.
Wherever you are, stop to smell the roses.

Quota on seeing the Evening Sky

“That’s the nature of being a parent, Sabine has discovered. You’ll love your children far more than you ever loved your parents, and – in the recognition that your own children cannot fathom the depth of your love – you come to understand the tragic, unrequited love of your own parents.” – Ursula Hegi, Stones from the River

As I was driving Adi back from school, he was trying to get a head start on his quiz prep with heads down (pun?!) pouring over a folder.

We drove over a high bridge.
From that vantage point, the colorful sky and the sun setting was a sight to behold.

I urged him to look up and enjoy the beautiful sight.
He glanced up for a bit and said “Oh…nice”.
Then, he looked down again at the folder.

That signalled the mark of my math based lecture.

Here is what I told him – “We all have a quota. Let us asssume that I live another 4 decades.. then I have approx 15,000 sunsets to behold. Let us asssume you live another 7 decades, then you have approx 25,000 sunsets to behold. Of those, there are going to be many cloudy, dark days of fall and winter. So, the actual days that you are out and about on a beautiful evening and have the chance to see the gorgeous evening sky….will be far less than the 25,000 sunsets number. So, please, enjoy it…while you can.”

I am sure he won’t get it now.

Sooner than later, an evening will arrive, when he is on a lake, mountain or ocean …sunggling beside the person who captured his heart. The sun will be setting. He will behold that evening sky. And, think it the most beautiful thing ever. He won’t want the evening to end.

Do you think he will remember my math based lecture?

No way.

This whole parenting thing is so tragic.

I need to exercise self control and stop my stupid long winded lectures. What is it worth? Nothing?


My friend Priya Bala had this witty response to my post:

What is it worth? Nothing.”

Hah! That boy, if he takes after you my dear, will be a player. A more likely scenario will be when both of them are snuggling and he notices the beautiful sky, he’ll remember your math lecture. He’ll assume a far-away look. Then he’ll chuckle gently. She’ll probably ask him what he’s thinking. And he’ll look deep into her eyes and he’ll respond:

“We all have a quota. Let us assume that we live another 6 decades. Then we have approximately 22,000 sunsets to behold. Of those, there are going to be many cloudy, dark days of fall and winter. So, the actual days when we’re out and about on a beautiful evening and have the chance to see the gorgeous evening sky….. will be far less than the 22,000 number. I’m just so glad I get to spend this precious one with you.”

And she’ll sigh and swoon. Mission accomplished!

Glorious Childhood

“Because children grow up, we think a child’s purpose is to grow up. But a child’s purpose is to be a child. Nature doesn’t disdain what lives only for a day. It pours the whole of itself into the each moment. We don’t value the lily less for not being made of flint and built to last. Life’s bounty is in its flow, later is too late. Where is the song when it’s been sung? The dance when it’s been danced? It’s only we humans who want to own the future, too. We persuade ourselves that the universe is modestly employed in unfolding our destination. We note the haphazard chaos of history by the day, by the hour, but there is something wrong with the picture. Where is the unity, the meaning, of nature’s highest creation? Surely those millions of little streams of accident and wilfulness have their correction in the vast underground river which, without a doubt, is carrying us to the place where we’re expected! But there is no such place, that’s why it’s called utopia. The death of a child has no more meaning than the death of armies, of nations. Was the child happy while he lived? That is a proper question, the only question. If we can’t arrange our own happiness, it’s a conceit beyond vulgarity to arrange the happiness of those who come after us.”
― Tom Stoppard, The Coast of Utopia